Product Synopsis

This report is the result of SDI's extensive market and company research covering the US defense industry, and provides detailed analysis of both historic and forecast defense industry values including key growth stimulators, analysis of the leading companies in the industry, and key news.

Introduction and Landscape

Why was the report written?
The Future of the US Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018 offers the reader an insight into the market opportunities and entry strategies adopted by foreign original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to gain market share in the US defense industry.

What is the current market landscape and what is changing?
The US has a defense budget of US$607.5 billion (including allocation for OCO) in 2014 and the government is expected to sustain a high level of expenditure over the forecast period. Although the allocation for overseas operations is estimated to remain stable at US$37.3 billion over the forecast period, the country is expected to increase its base military expenditure at a CAGR of 1.75%. The expenditure will be triggered by the government's plan to acquire advanced defense equipment coupled with replacement of old and obsolete arms and ammunitions. The looming threat of budget cuts and sequestration is not expected to terminate or affect the existing contracts, but will impact DoD's future contracts and the number of military hardware to be procured under these contracts. Significant opportunities are expected to exist in the fields of C4ISR, aircraft, cyber security, missile defense systems and submarines. Foreign defense companies and new entrants have the option to cater to the US defense market via joint development programs, strategic alliances, or acquisition of domestic players. The US government's encouragement of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the defense sector will also help foreign companies in entering the market.

What are the key drivers behind recent market changes?
Certain factors pertaining to the security of US are expected to drive the defense expenditure of the nation in the coming years. These include the country's efforts to retain its military supremacy over other nations and conflicts in Middle East. Additionally, ammunition modernization initiatives will also be an area of focus for military spending over the forecast period.

What makes this report unique and essential to read?
The Future of the US Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018 provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2014 to 2018, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

Key Features and Benefits

The report provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2014 to 2018, including highlights of key growth stimulators, and also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

The report includes trend analysis of imports and exports, together with their implications and impact on the US defense industry.

The report covers five forces analysis to identify various power centers in the industry and how these are expected to develop in the future.

The report allows readers to identify possible ways to enter the market, together with detailed descriptions of how existing companies have entered the market, including key contracts, alliances, and strategic initiatives.

The report helps the reader to understand the competitive landscape of the defense industry in US. It provides an overview of key defense companies, both domestic and foreign, together with insights such as key alliances, strategic initiatives, and a brief financial analysis.

Key Market Issues

The 2011 Budget Control Act (BCA) has set a cap on total national defense budget funding, starting with US$546 billion in 2013, to be reduced by US$54.3 billion each subsequent year. BCA required the US Department of Defense (DoD) to take US$487 billion of reductions in its expenditure over the period of 10 years. Sequestration, if allowed to go into effect, would alter virtually every aspect of DoD's planning. It would force a uniform reduction in budget authority of approximately 10.3% across all accounts, apart from military personnel.

The US must modernize its aging fleet of equipment, such as fighter aircraft, helicopters, land defense systems, and maritime equipment; however, the rising unit cost of defense systems poses a challenge to procurement funding. The cost of military hardware is increasing due to technological advancements and a shortage of skilled labor in the design, engineering, and manufacturing sectors, coupled with the rising cost of input materials such as metal. In addition, the per-unit overhead costs at production facilities increased due to a reduction in the number of units manufactured; for example, in the shipbuilding industry the cost of ship construction has been increasing 1.4% per year faster than the price of final goods and services in the US economy. The US government has reduced the amount of military hardware to be procured, resulting in a reduction in the number of units to be produced, a loss in profits, and increasing unemployment in such sectors

With the US aiming to reduce the country's defense expenditure by US$60 billion during 2013-2018, and rising personnel and health costs, the country's capital expenditure on defense is anticipated to decrease. Furthermore, the government encourages companies throughout the defense market to increase the efficiency of the organizations and sell unprofitable units. In addition, reverse engineering by countries like China and Iran will enable the defense companies of these countries to offer defense equipment at lower price, posing a challenge to the domestic defense companies of the US. According to SDI's Defense Industry Business Outlook 2013-2014 survey, 43% of respondents from the North American region agree that the reverse engineering from countries is the biggest concern for the defense industry in the coming five years, and as a result, defense companies will be compelled to take greater risks and accept lower profits on the limited number of available government contracts. Due to a combination of the above factors, unemployment is expected to increase, negotiations with suppliers and customers will become tense, and efforts to reduce expenses will increase across the board. Companies such as Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman have already taken strategic steps, such as the sale of unprofitable units and redundancy packages for senior managers, in order to reduce executive payrolls.

Key Highlights

The US is currently the leading military superpower in the world and has undertaken well-defined measures towards investing in the defense sector to reinforce its position as the most militarily powerful nation in the world. With this objective, the US is embarking upon a nuclear defense modernization plan and missile defense program that is expected to drive defense expenditure. Additionally, the government is working on enhancing its command, control, computers, communications, and intelligence systems to increase inter-operability between various branches of the armed forces. The other major military powers in the world - China and Russia - have consistently increased their defense expenditures significantly over the last couple of years. These countries have also taken steps to upgrade their military hardware and facilities. While China is developing a new-generation intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of destroying targets all across the world, Russia is also developing a heavy-liquid-fuel, non-nuclear, precision-guided payload capability for a new class of ICBMs, which would give Russia near-global coverage. Despite these measures adopted by China and Russia, the US remains determined to retain its military supremacy.

Over the last couple of years, the US has faced a number of terrorist attacks and this has propelled of the DHS to undertake measures to counter any terrorist attacks and ensure adequate protection. The DHS's counterterrorism responsibilities focus on preventing the unauthorized acquisition, importation, movement, or use of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) materials and capabilities within the United States. The department is also engaged in protecting the vital infrastructure and key resources of the country and identifying any events that might lead to terrorist attacks and other hazardous movements within the nation. The Boston Marathon bombings and the Los Angeles International Airport shooting have reinforced the need for counter terrorism measures and the country is expected to increase fund allocations for this purpose. As part of the 2014 budget, the DHS increased funding for research and development to address CBRN threats and undertaking the construction of a bio-containment facility, NBAF. Other significant fund allocations under this budget are for TSA Pre (security initiative for safeguarding the nation's transportation systems), Securing the Cities (STC) program, and intelligence and targeting programs.

The US has a highly developed defense industry that is capable of fulfilling the majority of domestic military requirements, and the nation is also the largest global exporter of defense equipment due to its highly advanced defense industrial base. Despite this, the US has become increasingly open to importing arms goods from foreign defense equipment suppliers in the UK and Canada, and consequently, arms imports registered a steady increase during the review period; the majority of imports consist of subsystems and components for aircraft and armored vehicles. Despite the global economic slowdown, US defense exports continued to grow that year; the largest consumers of US defense goods during 2008-2012 were South Korea, Australia, and the UAE. While the country exports all types of defense equipment, the majority consists of fighter aircraft, missile defense systems, armored vehicles, engines, and sensors.

Table Of Contents

1 Introduction
1.1. What is this Report bout?
1.2. Definitions
1.3. Summary Methodology
1.4. SDI Terrorism Index
1.5. About Strategic Defence Intelligence
2 Executive Summary
3 Market Attractiveness and Emerging Opportunities
3.1. Defense Market Size Historical and Forecast
3.1.1. US defense expenditure expected to increase at a CAGR of 1.93% over the forecast period
3.1.2. Initiatives to retain military superiority, equipment modernization program and turbulence in Middle East are expected to drive defense spending
3.1.3. Defense expenditure as a percentage of GDP estimated to decline over the forecast period
3.1.4. Per capita defense spending forecast to grow over the forecast period
3.2. Analysis of Defense Budget Allocation
3.2.1. Total DoD budget forecasted to grow at a CAGR of 1.64%
3.2.2. Share of revenue expenditure expected to increase over the forecast period
3.2.3. Navy to receive the major allocation of the defense budget over the forecast period
3.2.4. Allocation for revenue expenditure of the army expected to increase over the forecast period
3.2.5. Naval defense budget expected to grow at a CAGR of 1.73% over forecast period
3.2.6. Air Force expenditure expected to increase at a CAGR of 2.04% over the forecast period
3.2.7. Expenditure on the defense-wide category of armed forces projected to grow at a CAGR of 2.01% over the forecast period
3.3. Homeland Security Market Size and Forecast
3.3.1. The US homeland security expenditure to reach US$66.2 billion by 2019
3.3.2. Prevention of terrorism, securing and managing borders, and safeguarding cyberspace to drive homeland security expenditure over the forecast period
3.3.3. The nation is at “some risk” of terrorism
3.3.4. The US has a terrorism index score of 0.02
3.4. Benchmarking with Key Global Markets
3.4.1. The US will dominate global military spending over the forecast period
3.4.2. US defense budget is much higher than other leading spenders
3.4.3. US is one of the top defense spenders in terms of expenditure as a percentage of GDP
3.4.4. The US faces some threat from foreign terrorist organizations
3.5. Market Opportunities: Key Trends and Growth Stimulators
3.5.1. C4ISR - Land based
3.5.2. Networking
3.5.3. Multi-role Aircraft
3.5.4. Software Infrastructure
3.5.5. Missile Defense Systems
3.5.6. SSN Submarines
4 Defense Procurement Market Dynamics
4.1. Import Market Dynamics
4.1.1. US primarily imports defense equipment to build strategic relations
4.1.2. Defense imports grew at a CAGR of 10.1% during 2008-2012
4.1.3. The UK supplies the majority of US defense imports
4.1.4. Aircraft account for majority of arms imports
4.2. Export Market Dynamics
4.2.1. US arms exports are driven by political and economic factors
4.2.2. Arms exports expected to increase in the period 2015-2019
4.2.3. US defense exports to increase during the forecast period
4.2.4. Aircraft are the most exported defense equipment
4.2.5. The US maintains controlled defense export policy
5 Industry Dynamics
5.1. Five Forces Analysis
5.1.1. Bargaining power of Supplier: Medium to low
5.1.2. Bargaining power of Buyer: High
5.1.3. Barrier to entry: Medium
5.1.4. Intensity of rivalry: Low to high
5.1.5. Threat of Substitution: Low to high
6 Market Entry Strategy
6.1. Market Regulation
6.1.1. The US defense industry is open to FDI
6.1.2. No offset policy exists in the US
6.1.3. US arms trade is heavily regulated
6.2. Market Entry Route
6.2.1. Foreign OEMs enter the market through the acquisition of domestic defense companies
6.2.2. Joint product development programs, an attractive market entry route
6.2.3. Formation of partnerships with domestic defense firms provide good market entry opportunities
6.2.4. Direct sale of defense equipment provides foreign OEMs with an opportunity to enter the market
6.3. Key Challenges
6.3.1. Sequestration and budget cuts
6.3.2. Decreasing economies of scale and defense inflation
6.3.3. Declining profit margins deter growth of domestic defense companies
7 Competitive Landscape and Strategic Insights
7.1. Competitive Landscape Overview
7.2. Domestic Public Companies
7.2.1. Lockheed Martin Corp.: overview
7.2.2. Lockheed Martin Corp.: products and services
7.2.3. Lockheed Martin Corp.: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.2.4. Lockheed Martin Corp.: alliances
7.2.5. Lockheed Martin Corp.: recent contract wins
7.2.6. Lockheed Martin Corp.: financial analysis
7.2.7. Raytheon: overview
7.2.8. Raytheon: products and services
7.2.9. Raytheon: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.2.10. Raytheon: alliances
7.2.11. Raytheon: recent contract wins
7.2.12. Raytheon: financial analysis
7.2.13. General Dynamics: overview
7.2.14. General Dynamics: products and services
7.2.15. General Dynamics: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.2.16. General Dynamics: alliances
7.2.17. General Dynamics: recent contract wins
7.2.18. General Dynamics: financial analysis
7.2.19. Boeing: overview
7.2.20. Boeing: products and services
7.2.21. Boeing: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.2.22. Boeing: alliances
7.2.23. Boeing: recent contract wins
7.2.24. Boeing: financial analysis
7.2.25. L-3 Communications Corp.: overview
7.2.26. L-3 Communications Corp.: products and services
7.2.27. L-3 Communications Corp.: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.2.28. L-3 Communications Corp.: alliances
7.2.29. L-3 Communications Corp.: recent contract wins
7.2.30. L-3 Communications Corp.: financial analysis
7.2.31. Northrop Grumman Corp.: overview
7.2.32. Northrop Grumman Corp.: products and services
7.2.33. Northrop Grumman Corp.: recent contracts and strategic initiatives
7.2.34. Northrop Grumman Corporation: alliances
7.2.35. Northrop Grumman Corp.: recent contract wins
7.2.36. Northrop Grumman Corp.: financial analysis
7.2.37. Science Application International Corp. (SAIC): overview
7.2.38. Science Application International Corp. (SAIC): products and services
7.2.39. Science Application International Corp. (SAIC): recent contracts and strategic initiatives
7.2.40. Science Application International Corp. (SAIC): alliances
7.2.41. Science Application International Corp. (SAIC): recent contract wins
7.2.42. Science Application International Corp. (SAIC): financial analysis
7.2.43. Honeywell International Inc.: overview
7.2.44. Honeywell International Inc.: products and services
7.2.45. Honeywell International Inc.: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.2.46. Honeywell International Inc.: alliances
7.2.47. Honeywell International Inc.: recent contract wins
7.2.48. Honeywell International Inc.: financial analysis
7.3. Domestic Private Companies
7.3.1. Sikorsky Aircraft: overview
7.3.2. Sikorsky Aircraft: products and services
7.3.3. Sikorsky Aircraft: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.3.4. Sikorsky Aircraft: alliances
7.3.5. Sikorsky Aircraft: recent contract wins
7.3.6. General Electric Aviation: overview
7.3.7. General Electric Aviation: products and services
7.3.8. General Electric Aviation: recent contracts and strategic initiatives
7.3.9. General Electric Aviation: alliances
7.3.10. General Electric Aviation: recent contract wins
7.3.11. Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc.: overview
7.3.12. Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc.: products and services
7.3.13. Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc.: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.3.14. Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc.: alliances
7.3.15. Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc.: recent contract wins
7.3.16. Textron Marine and Land Systems: overview
7.3.17. Textron Marine and Land Systems: products and services
7.3.18. Textron Marine and Land Systems: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
7.3.19. Textron Marine and Land Systems: alliances
7.3.20. Textron Marine and Land Systems: recent contract wins
8 Business Environment and Country Risk
8.1. Demographics and Social Statistics
8.1.1. Total Rural Population
8.1.2. Total Urban Population
8.1.3. Number of households
8.2. Economic Performance
8.2.1. GDP Per Capita
8.2.2. GDP, Current Prices
8.2.3. Consumer Price Index
8.2.4. Wholesale Price Index
8.2.5. Local Currency Unit per Euro
8.2.6. Lending Rate
8.2.7. Real Interest Rate
8.2.8. Market Capitalization of Listed Companies
8.2.9. Market Capitalization of Listed Companies (% of GDP)
8.2.10. Government Cash Surplus/Deficit
8.2.11. Government Cash Surplus/Deficit as % of GDP
8.2.12. Central Government Debt
8.2.13. Central Government Debt as % of GDP
8.2.14. Goods exports as % of GDP
8.2.15. Goods imports as % of GDP
8.2.16. Goods Trade Surplus/Deficit as % of GDP
8.2.17. Service Imports as % of GDP
8.2.18. Service Exports as % of GDP
8.2.19. Service Trade Surplus/Deficit as % of GDP
8.2.20. Foreign Direct Investment
8.2.21. Net foreign direct investment as % of GDP
8.2.22. International reserves, including gold
8.3. Energy and Utilities
8.3.1. Conventional Thermal Electricity Net Generation
8.3.2. Hydroelectricity Net Generation
8.3.3. Nuclear Electricity Net Generation
8.3.4. Conventional Thermal Electricity Installed Capacity
8.3.5. Electricity Exports
8.3.6. Electricity Imports
8.3.7. Proved Natural Gas Reserves
8.3.8. Petroleum Consumption
8.3.9. Crude Oil Proved Reserves
8.3.10. Total Non-Hydro Renewable Electricity Net Generation
8.4. Infrastructure
8.4.1. Rail Lines
8.4.2. Air transport, freight
8.4.3. Overall Construction
8.5. Minerals
8.5.1. Mining, Manufacturing, Utilities Output
8.6. Technology
8.6.1. Research and Development Expenditure
8.6.2. Patents Granted
8.7. Telecommunication
8.7.1. Telephone Lines
8.7.2. Telephone Lines Penetration Rate
9 Appendix
9.1. About SDI
9.2. Disclaimer


List of Tables

Table 1: US Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2010-2014
Table 2: US Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2015-2019
Table 3: US GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth vs. Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2010-2014
Table 4: US GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP Growth, 2015-2019
Table 5: US Per Capita Defense Expenditure, 2010-2014
Table 6: US Per Capita Defense Expenditure, 2015-2019
Table 7: US Defense Budget Split by Base Budget, OCO, and Other Funds (US$ Billion), 2010-2014
Table 8: US Defense Budget Split by Base Budget, OCO, and Other Funds (US$ Billion), 2010-2014
Table 9: US Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2010-2014
Table 10: US Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2015-2019
Table 11: US Defense Expenditure Allocation for Army, Air Force, Navy, and Defense-wide (%), 2010-2014
Table 12: US Defense Expenditure Allocation for Army, Air Force, Navy, and Defense-wide (%), 2015-2019
Table 13: US Defense Budget Allocation for Army (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Table 14: US Defense Budget Allocation for Army (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Table 15: US Defense Budget Allocation for Navy (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Table 16: US Defense Budget Allocation for Navy (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Table 17: US Defense Budget Allocation for Air Force (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Table 18: US Defense Budget Allocation for Air Force (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Table 19: US Defense Budget Allocation for Defense-Wide Expenditure (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Table 20: US Defense Budget Allocation for Defense-wide Expenditure (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Table 21: US Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Table 22: US Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Table 23: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2010-2014 vs. 2015-2019
Table 24: SDI Terrorism Index
Table 25: Lockheed Martin Corp - product focus
Table 26: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Alliances
Table 27: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Recent Contract Wins
Table 28: Raytheon - Product Focus
Table 29: Raytheon - Alliances
Table 30: Raytheon - Recent Contract Wins
Table 31: General Dynamics - product focus
Table 32: General Dynamics - Alliances
Table 33: General Dynamics - Recent Contract Wins
Table 34: Boeing - product focus
Table 35: Boeing - Alliances
Table 36: Boeing - Recent Contract Wins
Table 37: L-3 Communications Corp. - Product Focus
Table 38: L-3 Communications Corp. - Alliances
Table 39: L-3 Communications Corp. - Recent Contract Wins
Table 40: Northrop Grumman Corp.- Product Focus
Table 41: Northrop Grumman Corporation - Alliances
Table 42: Northrop Grumman Corp. - Recent Contract Wins
Table 43: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Product Focus
Table 44: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Alliances
Table 45: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Recent Contract Wins
Table 46: Honeywell International Inc. - product focus
Table 47: Honeywell International Inc. - Alliances
Table 48: Honeywell International Inc.- Recent Contract Wins
Table 49: Sikorsky Aircraft - Product Focus
Table 50: Sikorsky Aircraft - Alliances
Table 51: Sikorsky Aircraft - Recent Contract Wins
Table 52: General Electric Aviation - Product Focus
Table 53: General Electric Aviation - Alliances
Table 54: General Electric Aviation - Recent Contract Wins
Table 55: Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. - Product Focus
Table 56: Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. - Alliances
Table 57: Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. - Recent Contract Wins
Table 58: Textron Marine and Land Systems - Product Focus
Table 59: Textron Marine and Land Systems - Alliances
Table 60: Textron Marine and Land Systems - Recent Contract Wins


List of Figures

Figure 1: US Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2010-2014
Figure 2: US Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2015-2019
Figure 3: US GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth vs. Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2010-2014
Figure 4: US GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2015-2019
Figure 5: US Per Capita Defense Expenditure, 2010-2014
Figure 6: US Per Capita Defense Expenditure, 2015-2019
Figure 7:US Defense Budget Split by Base Budget, OCO, and Other Funds (US$ Billion), 2010-2014
Figure 8: US Defense Budget Split by Base Budget, OCO, and Other Funds (US$ Billion), 2015-2019
Figure 9: US Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2010-2014
Figure 10: US Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2015-2019
Figure 11: US Defense Expenditure Allocation for Army, Air Force, Navy, and Defense-wide (%), 2010-2014
Figure 12:US Defense Expenditure Allocation for Army, Air Force, Navy, and Defense-wide (%), 2015-2019
Figure 13: US Defense Budget Allocation for Army (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Figure 14: US Defense Budget Allocation for Army (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Figure 15: US Defense Budget Allocation for Navy (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Figure 16: US Defense Budget Allocation for Navy (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Figure 17: US Defense Budget Allocation for Air Force (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Figure 18: US Defense Budget Allocation for Air Force (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Figure 19: US Defense Budget Allocation for Defense-Wide Expenditure (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Figure 20: US Defense Budget Allocation for Defense-wide Expenditure (US$ billion),
Figure 21: US Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2010-2014
Figure 22: US Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2015-2019
Figure 23: SDI Terrorism Heat Map, 2013
Figure 24: SDI Terrorism Index, 2013
Figure 25: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2010-2014 vs. 2015-2019
Figure 26: Defense Expenditure of the World's Largest Military Spenders (US$ Billion), 2014 and 2019
Figure 27: Defense Expenditure as a Percentage of GDP of Largest Military Spenders (%), 2014
Figure 28: C4ISR - Land based Market Size (US$ Billion), 2014-2024
Figure 29: Networking Market Size (US$ Billion), 2014-2024
Figure 30: Multi-role Aircraft Market Size (US$ Billion), 2014-2024
Figure 31: Software Infrastructure Market Size (US$ Billion), 2014-2024
Figure 32: Missile Defense Systems Market Size (US$ Billion), 2014-2024
Figure 33: SSN submarines Market Size (US$ Billion), 2014-2024
Figure 34: US Defense Import Trend (US$ Million), 2008-2012
Figure 35: US Defense Imports by Country (%),2008-2012
Figure 36: US Defense Imports by Category (%), 2008-2012
Figure 37: US Defense exports (US$ Million),2008-2012
Figure 38: US Defense Exports by Country (%), 2008-2012
Figure 39: US Defense Exports by Category (%),2008-2012
Figure 40: Industry Dynamics - Porter's Five Forces Analysis
Figure 41: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 42: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 43: Lockheed Martin Corp. - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 44: Raytheon - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 45: Raytheon - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 46: Raytheon - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 47: General Dynamics - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 48: General Dynamics - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 49: General Dynamics - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 50: Boeing - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 51: Boeing - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 52: Boeing - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 53: L-3 Communications Corp. - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 54: L-3 Communications Corp. - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 55: L-3 Communications Corp. - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 56: Northrop Grumman Corp. - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 57: Northrop Grumman Corp. - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 58: Northrop Grumman Corp. - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 59: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 60: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ million), 2009-2013
Figure 61: Science Application International Corp. (SAIC) - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ million), 2009-2013
Figure 62: Honeywell International Inc. - Revenue Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 63: Honeywell International Inc. - Operating Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 64: Honeywell International Inc. - Net Profit Trend Analysis (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 65: US Rural Population (In Millions), 2010-2019
Figure 66: US Urban Population (In Millions), 2010-2019
Figure 67: US Number of Households (In Millions), 2008-2017
Figure 68: US GDP Per Capita, 2010-2019
Figure 69: US GDP, Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2010-2019
Figure 70: US Consumer Price Index, 2010-2019
Figure 71: US Wholesale Price Index, 2003-2012
Figure 72: Local Currency per Euro, 2010-2019
Figure 73: Lending Rate, 2003-2012
Figure 74: Real Interest Rate, 2003-2012
Figure 75: US Market Capitalization of Listed Companies (US$ Billion), 2003-2012
Figure 76: US Market Capitalization of Listed Companies (% of GDP), 2002-2011
Figure 77: US Government Cash Surplus/Deficit (LCU Billion), 2002-2011
Figure 78: US Government Cash Surplus/Deficit as % of GDP, 2002-2011
Figure 79: US Central Government Debt (LCU Bn), 2002-2011
Figure 80: US Central Government Debt as % of GDP, 2003-2011
Figure 81: US Goods Exports as % of GDP, 2002-2011
Figure 82: US Goods Imports as % of GDP, 2002-2011
Figure 83: US Goods Trade Surplus/Deficit as % of GDP, 2002-2011
Figure 84: US Service Imports as % of GDP, 2002-2011
Figure 85: US Service Exports as % of GDP, 2002-2011
Figure 86: US Service Trade Surplus/Deficit as % of GDP, 2002-2011
Figure 87: US Foreign Direct Investment (US$ Billion), 2002-2011
Figure 88: US Net foreign direct investment as % of GDP, 2002-2011
Figure 89: US International reserves, including gold (US$ Billion), 2002-2011
Figure 90: US Conventional Thermal Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2002-2011
Figure 91: US Hydroelectricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2002-2011
Figure 92: US Nuclear Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2003-2012
Figure 93: US Conventional Thermal Electricity Installed Capacity (Million Kilowatts), 2001-2010
Figure 94: US Electricity Exports (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2002-2011
Figure 95: US Electricity Imports (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2003-2012
Figure 96: US Proved Natural Gas Reserves (Trillion Cubic Feet), 2003-2012
Figure 97: US Petroleum Consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day), 2003-2012
Figure 98: US Crude Oil Proved Reserves (Billion Barrels), 2002-2011
Figure 99: US Total Non-Hydro Renewable Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatts), 2002-2011
Figure 100: US Rail Lines (kms), 2003-2011
Figure 101: US Air transport freight (million ton-km), 2002-2011
Figure 102: US Overall Construction (US$ Billion), 2007-2017
Figure 103: US Mining, Manufacturing, Utilities Output (US$ Billion), 2002-2011
Figure 104: US Research and Development Expenditure, 2001-2009
Figure 105: US Patents Granted, 2003-2012
Figure 106: US Telephone Lines (In Million), 2003-2012
Figure 107: US Telephone Lines Penetration Rate (Per 100 People), 2003-2012


Companies Mentioned

Lockheed Martin, Raytheon , General Dynamics, Boeing, L-3 Communications, Northrop Grumman, Science Application International ,Honeywell International ,Sikorsky Aircraft.

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Global Military Training and Simulation (T&S) Market Assessment

Global Military Training and Simulation (T&S) Market Assessment

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  • June 2014
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Augmented Training Solutions Continue to Gain Traction The global military T&S market has been broken down into three end-user segments: Air, Land and Naval end users. It provides an analysis of accessible ...

Global Military Unmanned Maritime Systems Market

Global Military Unmanned Maritime Systems Market

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Market is Poised for Substantial Growth After a Few More Years of Development and Testing The global unmanned maritime systems (UMS) market is a relatively nascent market in which innovations are rapidly ...

Smart Machines: Technologies and Global Markets

Smart Machines: Technologies and Global Markets

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  • by BCC Research

The global market for smart machines was valued at $5.3 billion in 2013. This market is expected to increase to over $6.2 billion in 2014 and nearly $15.3 billion in 2019, a compound annual growth rate ...

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