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Monetization of the Connected Home

  • January 2014
  • -
  • Continental Automated Building Association (CABA)
  • -
  • 392 pages

This report has been created by IHS, a leading analyst research firm, for the Continental Automated Buildings Association (CABA). CABA is a leader in initiating and developing cross-industry collaborative research, under the CABA Research Program. Following the CABA Digital Home Forum at Qualcomm, San Diego, CA (October 2012), attendees selected the topic of Monetization for the Connected Home Landmark Research Study for 2013.

ABOUT CABA
CABA is an industry association dedicated to the advancement of connected homes and intelligent buildings technologies. CABA is an international association, with over 350 major private and public technology organizations committed to research and development within the intelligent buildings and connected home sector. Association members are involved in the design, manufacture, installation and retailing of products and services for home and building automation.

IHS was commissioned by CABA, as a result of an extensive competitive bid process, to provide bespoke research and support in strategy development, by conducting this research for CABA as part of the Connected Home Council (CHC) Landmark Research Study for 2013.

ABOUT IHS
IHS is the leading source of information, insight and analytics in critical areas that shape today's business landscape. Businesses and governments in more than 165 countries around the globe rely on the comprehensive content, expert independent analysis and flexible delivery methods of IHS to make highimpact decisions and develop strategies with speed and confidence. IHS has been in business since 1959 and became a publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange in 2005. Headquartered
in Englewood, Colorado, IHS is committed to sustainable, profitable growth and employs 6,700 people in 31 countries around the world.

IHS combines market, technology and supply chain analysis and forecasts at every operational step of the electronics value chain from strategy, planning and analysis to product design and development and supply chain management.

ES2 REPORT METHODOLOGY
Two main primary research processes were conducted for this report: extensive interviews with industry participants and an online end-user survey of North American consumers.

INDUSTRY PARTICIPANT INTERVIEWS

A series of detailed interviews were conducted by telephone with key decision-makers at a number of different types of organizations, across the following company types: device suppliers, existing service providers, dedicated service providers, specialist home automation providers, contractors and installers, dealers and distributors, utility companies, retailers and platform and software providers.

IHS conducted 21 in-depth interviews during the process of this specific study. These interviews were informed by IHS’s extensive knowledge of conducting research in this area, including a large scale study, ‘Connectivity Opportunities in the Smart Home – World – 2012’ (IHS: 2012) which involved conducting more than 40 interviews with a wide range of relevant industry participants located in Europe, North America and Asia Pacific.

NORTH AMERICAN END-USER SURVEY
IHS, in conjunction with the CABA project steering committee members, developed an end-user survey to assess consumer attitudes towards the connected home and associated features, pricing models, and other interesting issues (such as data privacy and value-added services). This consumer survey was completed online by 1,000 North American respondents.

PREVIOUS IHS RESEARCH STUDIES

Importantly, the analysts responsible for this report used IHS’ extensive library of both internal and published research studies in related areas. For a full list, please see Appendix 5 - Bibliography.

ES3 CONNECTED HOME MARKET OVERVIEW

North America is projected to continue to be the largest market for connected home devices over the coming years, despite growing signs of deployment in both Asia and Europe. Within North America, home monitoring is expected to continue to be primary driver of system installation within the mass market. However, energy management, as well as comfort and convenience applications, are expected to grow significantly in North America as secondary value propositions (Source: IHS, Connectivity
Opportunities in the Smart Home – World – 2012).

Cloud-based home control systems for mass market consumers are set to be the key catalyst for much of the growth in the connected home market (in terms of device shipments). A number of key trends expected to mold the connected home competitive landscape over the coming three years:

- The range of existing companies offering connected home systems and services to consumers will continue to increase. In the past, most cloud-based home control systems have been offered through dedicated connected home players, such as Alarm.com. However, over the past few years, existing service providers – such as ADT, Verizon and Comcast – have moved into this market. Now, other types of companies – such as retailers – have started to enter, offering their own platform-based systems. The provision of connected home systems and services is open to a wide variety of companies; in many cases there is an opportunity for partnerships which can enable the monetization of different aspects of the connected home for different parties.

- Suppliers of standard or ‘non-connected’ devices will increasingly release connected alternatives of traditional product ranges (such as thermostats or appliances), as well as connected home-specific products, such as smart plugs. In addition, a range of new device OEMs will emerge aimed at the creation of unique product offerings specific to the connected home, as Nest has done with its smart thermostat and smoke alarm products.

- More device suppliers will start to offer their own customer-facing connected home systems, using a variety of pricing models. In some cases, the associated service costs could be included as part of the upfront hardware cost, in order to differentiate from other systems available from existing service providers, which typically have an on-going service element.

Interestingly, results from the end-user survey suggested this may be a viable alternative, with a significant proportion of respondents indicating a preference for higher upfront costs rather than subscription contracts. Should this latter pricing model occur on a widespread scale, this could prove highly disruptive to a market which many are already monetizing based on recurring service revenues.

- Many consider platform providers to be the backbone of the connected home value chain, enabling much of the functionality which is driving connected home value from a consumer perspective, such as the ability to receive automated alerts and to manage in-home devices from a smartphone or tablet. As other company types start to enter the market – from retailers to existing service providers or device OEMs – many of these companies will utilize thirdparty platform developers. Current dedicated service providers (such as Revolv or Nest) may leverage the software and platform requirements from the growing number of entrants to the market and reposition themselves as platform providers, developing the backend platform supporting third-party connected home initiatives, as AlertMe and Alarm.com have previously done.

- As the market evolves, a number of related opportunities will become more evident, spanning multiple company types and associated markets. This could range from telehealth monitoring (creating a platform to enable device data to be shared remotely with institutional healthcare networks), to demand-response (assisting utility companies in the deployment of residential load management programs, including dynamic pricing programs) or commercial building automation (leveraging connected devices and the associated data to ensure efficient building operation).

It is important to note, however, that features which have a wider audience outside of those interested in home automation and remote home control are projected to play an increasing role within the future connected home market, such as remote diagnostics and e-commerce options (for example, automatically ordering new device peripherals, like filters, when required). These value added services represent a method of monetization beyond the initial upfront system costs or on-going service fees.

Table Of Contents

Monetization of the Connected Home
Executive Summary 13
ES1 Introduction 13
ES2 Report Methodology 14
ES3 Connected Home Market Overview 14
ES4 Identifying Opportunities in the Connected Home 16
ES5 Connected Home Applications 18
ES6 Connected Home Pricing Analysis. 19
ES7 Connected Home Monetization Models. 24
1 Introduction 32
1.1 Introduction 32
1.2 Report Structure 32
1.3 Report Methodology 34
1.4 Use of Device Examples 36
2 Connected Home Overview and Summary of Findings. 37
2.1 Introduction 37
2.2 Connected Home Market Overview 38
2.3 Connected Home Ecosystem 39
2.4 Connected Home Monetization 42
2.5 Other Key Industry Considerations 60
3 Connected Home Ecosystem and Monetization Model Analysis 67
3.1 Industry Recommendations and Market Expectations 67
3.1.1 Industry Recommendations 68
3.2 Ecosystem of the Connected Home 90
3.2.1 Existing Service Providers 90
3.2.2 Dedicated Service Providers 99
3.2.3 Specialist Home Automation Providers 105
3.2.4 Connected Home Device Suppliers 110
3.2.5 Contractors and Installation Companies 115
3.2.6 Distributors 120
3.2.7 Utility Companies 123
3.2.8 Retailers 130
3.2.9 Connected Home Platform Providers 134
3.3 Business Models in the Connected Home Market 139
3.3.1. Recurring Revenue Models 139
3.3.2. Upfront Costing Models 144
3.3.3. Further Connected Home Monetization Strategies 149
4 End-user Survey Analysis 162
4.1 Introduction 162
4.2 Connected-Home Device Ownership 162
4.3 Connected-Home Future Use-case 182
4.4 Connected-Home Service-specific Features and Considerations 226
4.5 Scenario Creation 263
4.6 Value-Added Applications and Services 275
4.7 Data Privacy and Willingness to Provide Data 290
4.8 Warranty and Insurance Expectation 292
4.9 Advertising and Education 298
Appendix 1: Company Profiles 302
AP1.0 Introduction 302
AP1.1 ADT 302
AP1.2 Verizon 303
AP1.3 Comcast 304
AP1.4 ATandT 306
Appendix 2: Respondent Demographics 308
AP2.0 Introduction 308
AP2.1 Respondent Location 308
AP2.2 Respondent Age Category 309
AP2.3 Respondent Gender 310
AP2.4 Household Information 312
AP2.5 Respondent Indexing 330
AP2.6 Respondent Device or Product Ownership 333
Appendix 3: Additional End-user Survey Analysis 346
AP3.0 Introduction 346
AP3.1 Return on Device Investment via Energy Saving 346
AP3.2 Scenario Creation 351
AP3.3 Voice Activation 355
AP3.4 Remote Diagnostics 356
AP3.5 Remote Software Upgrades 358
AP3.6 Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce 361
AP3.7 Universal Help Butttons 362
AP3.8 Data Sharing and Data Privacy 365
AP3.9 Expectation and Length of Warranties 370
AP3.10 Expectation of Insurance 376
AP3.11 Advertising and Education Channels 377
North American Electricity Infrastructure Overview 380
Appendix 4: North American Electricity Infrastructure Overview 380
Appendix 5: Bibliography 388


TABLES
Table 2.1: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 43
Table 2.2: Question 3.6 - Device Cost 47
Table 2.3: Question 3.6 - Device Premium 47
Table 2.4: Consumer Attitudes to Scenario Creation 51
Table 2.5: Question 2.1 - Connected Device Ownership 60
Table 4.1: Question 2.1 - Connected Device Ownership 163
Table 4.2: Question 2.1 - Connected Device Ownership 166
Table 4.3: Question 2.1 - Connected Device Ownership 167
Table 4.4: Question 2.1 - Connected Device Ownership 167
Table 4.5: Question 2.1 - Connected Device Ownership 168
Table 4.6: Question 4.1 - Connected Device Cost 168
Table 4.7: Question 4.2 - Upfront System Cost 170
Table 4.8: Question 4.3 - System Installation Fee 171
Table 4.9: Question 4.3 - System Installation Fee 172
Table 4.10: Question 4.3 - System Installation Fee 173
Table 4.11: Question 4.4 - Associated Service Monthly Fee 173
Table 4.12: Question 4.4 - Associated Service Monthly Fee 174
Table 4.13: Question 4.4 - Associated Service Monthly Fee 175
Table 4.14: Question 4.5 - Associated Service Monthly Cost 176
Table 4.15: Question 4.6 - Purchase Reason: Energy Management 177
Table 4.16: Question 4.7 - Purchase Reason: Safety and Security 177
Table 4.17: Question 4.8 - Purchase Reason: Elderly Monitoring 178
Table 4.18: Question 4.9 - Purchase Reason: Elderly Monitoring 179
Table 4.19: Question 4.10 - Purchase Reason: Entertainment 180
Table 4.20: Question 2.4 - Elderly Monitoring System Type 181
Table 4.21: Question 2.5 - Routine Deviation Alert 181
Table 4.22: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 184
Table 4.23: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 185
Table 4.24: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 187
Table 4.25: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 189
Table 4.26: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 191
Table 4.27: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 192
Table 4.28: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 192
Table 4.29: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 193
Table 4.30: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 193
Table 4.31: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 193
Table 4.32: Question 2.3 - Lack of Use-case Selection 194
Table 4.33: Question 2.3 - Lack of Use-case Selection 195
Table 4.34: Question 2.3 - Lack of Use-case Selection 195
Table 4.35: Question 2.3 - Lack of Use-case Selection 196
Table 4.36: Question 3.5 - Use-case Ranking 196
Table 4.37: Question 3.1 - Use-case Monthly Cost 198
Table 4.38: Question 3.1 - Use-case Monthly Cost: All Selections 200
Table 4.39: Question 3.1 - Use-case Monthly Cost: All Selections 201
Table 4.40: Question 3.2 - Use-case Display 202

Table 4.41: Question 3.3 - Single Application Value 204
Table 4.42: Question 3.3 - Single Application Value 204
Table 4.43: Question 3.4 - Data-type 206
Table 4.44: Question 3.4 - Data-type 206
Table 4.45: Question 3.4 - Data-type 207
Table 4.46: Question 3.4 - Data-type 208
Table 4.47: Question 3.6 - Device Cost 209
Table 4.48: Question 3.6 - Device Premium 210
Table 4.49: Question 3.6 - Window/Door Sensor 211
Table 4.50: Question 3.6 - Connected Window Lock 212
Table 4.51: Question 3.6 - Motion Sensors 212
Table 4.52: Question 3.6 - Connected Door Lock 213
Table 4.53: Question 3.6 - Hazard Detector 213
Table 4.54: Question 3.7 - Device Purchase Influence 214
Table 4.55: Question 3.7 - Device Purchase Influence 214
Table 4.56: Question 3.8 - Device Purchase Influence 215
Table 4.57: Question 3.8 - Device Purchase Influence 216
Table 4.58: Question 3.9 - Device Purchase Influence 217
Table 4.59: Question 3.9 - Device Purchase Influence 217
Table 4.60: Question 3.10 - Device Purchase Influence 218
Table 4.61: Question 3.10 - Device Purchase Influence 219
Table 4.62: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe 220
Table 4.63: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe: Intruder Notification 222
Table 4.64: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe: Intruder Notification 222
Table 4.65: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe: Intruder Notification 223
Table 4.66: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe: Intruder Notification 223
Table 4.67: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe: Hazard Detection 224
Table 4.68: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe: Hazard Detection 224
Table 4.69: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe: Climate Control 225
Table 4.70: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe: Climate Control 225
Table 4.71: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 227
Table 4.72: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 229
Table 4.73: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 229
Table 4.74: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 230
Table 4.75: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 231
Table 4.76: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 232
Table 4.77: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 232
Table 4.78: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 233
Table 4.79: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 234
Table 4.80: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 236
Table 4.81: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 237
Table 4.82: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 238
Table 4.83: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 239
Table 4.84: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 240
Table 4.85: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 241
Table 4.86: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 242

Table 4.87: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 244
Table 4.88: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 246
Table 4.89: Question 5.5 - Installation Preference 248
Table 4.90: Question 5.5 - Installation Preference 248
Table 4.91: Question 5.5 - Installation Preference 249
Table 4.92: Question 5.5 - Installation Preference 249
Table 4.93: Question 5.7 - Self-install Motivation 250
Table 4.94: Question 5.7 - Self-install Motivation 250
Table 4.95: Question 5.7 - Self-install Motivation 251
Table 4.96: Question 5.7 - Self-install Motivation 252
Table 4.97: Question 5.6 - Professional Install Motivation 253
Table 4.98: Question 5.6 - Professional Install Motivation 254
Table 4.99: Question 5.6 - Professional Install Motivation 255
Table 4.100: Question 5.6 - Professional Install Motivation 256
Table 4.101: Question 5.8 - Network On-Boarding 257
Table 4.102: Question 5.8 - Network On-Boarding 257
Table 4.103: Question 5.8 - Network On-Boarding 258
Table 4.104: Question 5.8 - Network On-Boarding 259
Table 4.105: Question 5.8 - Network On-Boarding 259
Table 4.106: Question 5.8 - Network On-Boarding 260
Table 4.107: Question 5.8 - Network On-Boarding 260
Table 4.108: Question 5.8 - Network On-Boarding 261
Table 4.109: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 262
Table 4.110: Consumer Attitudes to Scenario Creation 263
Table 4.111: Scenario One - Use of GPS in Car or Smartphone 265
Table 4.112: Scenario One - Use of GPS in Car or Smartphone 265
Table 4.113: Scenario One - Use of GPS in Car or Smartphone 266
Table 4.114: Scenario Two - Home Occupancy as Trigger for Lights and Heating/Cooling 267
Table 4.115: Scenario Two - Home Occupancy as Trigger for Lights and Heating/Cooling 267
Table 4.116: Scenario Two - Home Occupancy as Trigger for Lights and Heating/Cooling 268
Table 4.117: Scenario Three - Media as Trigger for Device Automation 269
Table 4.118: Scenario Three - Media as Trigger for Device Automation 269
Table 4.119: Scenario Four - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Climate 270
Table 4.120: Scenario Four - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Climate 271
Table 4.121: Scenario Four - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Climate 271
Table 4.122: Scenario Five - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Online Information 272
Table 4.123: Scenario Five - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Online Information 273
Table 4.124: Scenario Five - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Online Information 273
Table 4.125: Scenario Six - Automation of Today's Manual Processes 274
Table 4.126: Scenario Six - Automation of Today's Manual Processes 274
Table 4.127: Scenario Six - Automation of Today's Manual Processes 275
Table 4.128: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation 277
Table 4.129: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation 277
Table 4.130: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation 278
Table 4.131: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation 278
Table 4.132: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation 279

Table 4.133: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation - by End Use Case 280
Table 4.134: Consumer Attitudes to Pre-Emption of Device Repairs 281
Table 4.135: Consumer Attitudes to Pre-Emption of Device Repairs 282
Table 4.136: Consumer Attitudes to Pre-Emption of Device Repairs - by Income 282
Table 4.137: Consumer Attitudes to Pre-Emption of Device Repairs - by Decision Making Role 283
Table 4.138: Consumer Attitudes to Pre-Emption of Device Repairs -
by Technology Adoption Index 283
Table 4.139: Consumer Attitudes to Remote Software Upgrades - Overview 284
Table 4.140: Consumer Attitudes to Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce - Overview 285
Table 4.141: Consumer Attitudes to Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce -
by Location 286
Table 4.142: Consumer Attitudes to Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce - by Age ...287 Table 4.143: Consumer Attitudes to Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce -
by Technology Adoption Index 287
Table 4.144: Consumer Attitudes to Universal Help Buttons - Overview 288
Table 4.145: Consumer Attitudes to Universal Help Buttons - by Technology Adoption Index 289
Table 4.146: Consumer Attitudes to Data Sharing - Overview 290
Table 4.147: Consumer Attitudes to Data Sharing - by Technology Adoption Index 291
Table 4.148: Consumer Attitudes to Data Privacy - Overview 292
Table 4.149: Consumer Expectation of Warranties - Overview 293
Table 4.150: Consumer Expectation of Warranty Length - Overview 293
Table 4.151: Consumer Expectation of Warranties - by Location 294
Table 4.152: Consumer Expectation of Insurance Provision - Overview 295
Table 4.153: Consumer Expectation of Insurance Provision - by Age 296
Table 4.154: Consumer Expectation of Insurance Provision - by income 296
Table 4.155: Consumer Expectation of Insurance Provision - by Technology Adoption Index 297
Table 4.156: Comparison of Consumer Expectation of Warranty and
Expecation of Insurance Provision 297
Table 4.157: Advertising and Education Channels - Overview 298
Table 4.158: Advertising and Education Channels - by Location 299
Table 4.159: Advertising and Education Channels - by Age 300
Managed Service Provider Profile 1.1: ADT (Pulse) 302
Managed Service Provider Profile 1.2: Verizon 303
Managed Service Provider Profile 1.3: Comcast 304
Managed Service Provider Profile 1.4: ATandT 306
Table AP2.1: Question 1.1 - Respondent Location 308
Table AP2.2: Question 1.2 - Respondent Age 309
Table AP2.3: Question 1.3 - Respondent Gender 310
Table AP2.4: Question 1.3 - Respondent Gender 311
Table AP2.5: Question 1.3 - Respondent Gender 312
Table AP2.6: Question 1.4 - Respondent Housing Tenure 313
Table AP2.7: Question 1.4 - Respondent Housing Tenure 313
Table AP2.8: Question 1.4 - Respondent Housing Tenure 314
Table AP2.9: Question 1.4 - Respondent Housing Tenure 315
Table AP2.10: Question 1.5 - Dwelling-type 316

Table AP2.11: Question 1.5 - Dwelling-type 317
Table AP2.12: Question 1.5 - Dwelling-type 318
Table AP2.13: Question 1.5 - Dwelling-type 319
Table AP2.14: Question 1.5 - Dwelling-type 320
Table AP2.15: Question 1.7 - Household Income 320
Table AP2.16: Question 1.7 - Household Income 321
Table AP2.17: Question 1.7 - Household Income 323
Table AP2.18: Question 1.7 - Household Income 324
Table AP2.19: Question 1.6 - Monthly Electricity Spend 325
Table AP2.20: Question 1.6 - Monthly Electricity Spend 326
Table AP2.21: Question 1.6 - Monthly Electricity Spend 327
Table AP2.22: Question 1.6 - Monthly Electricity Spend 329
Table AP2.23: Question 1.8 - Decision Making 330
Table AP2.24: Question 1.9a - Technology Adoption 331
Table AP2.25: Question 1.9b - Energy Efficiency 332
Table AP2.26: Question 1.10 - Smart TV 333
Table AP2.27: Question 1.10 - Smart TV 334
Table AP2.28: Question 1.11 - Vehicle-type 335
Table AP2.29: Question 1.11 - Vehicle-type 335
Table AP2.30: Question 1.11 - Vehicle-type 336
Table AP2.31: Question 1.11 - Vehicle-type 337
Table AP2.32: Question 1.12 - Photovoltaic System 338
Table AP2.33: Question 1.13 - Pool Pump 339
Table AP2.34: Question 1.13 - Pool Pump 339
Table AP2.35: Question 1.13 - Pool Pump 340
Table AP2.36: Question 1.14 - Security System 341
Table AP2.37: Question 1.14 - Security System 342
Table AP2.38: Question 1.14 - Security System 343
Table AP2.39: Question 1.15 - Security System Description 344
Table AP2.40: Question 1.15 - Security System Description 344
Table AP3.1: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 346
Table AP3.2: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 347
Table AP3.3: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 347
Table AP3.4: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 348
Table AP3.5: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 348
Table AP3.6: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 349
Table AP3.7: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 349
Table AP3.8: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 350
Table AP3.9: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 350
Table AP3.10: Return on Investment via Energy Saving 351
Table AP3.11: Scenario One - Use of GPS in Car or Smartphone 351
Table AP3.12: Scenario One - Use of GPS in Car or Smartphone 352
Table AP3.13: Scenario Two - Security System as Trigger for Lights and Heating/Cooling 352
Table AP3.14: Scenario Two - Security System as Trigger for Lights and Heating/Cooling 352
Table AP3.15: Scenario Three - Media as Trigger for Device Automation 353
Table AP3.16: Scenario Three - Media as Trigger for Device Automation 353

Table AP3.17: Scenario Four - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Climate 354
Table AP3.18: Scenario Four - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Climate 354
Table AP3.19: Scenario Five - Automatic Reaction of Devices to Online Information 354
Table AP3.20: Scenario Six - Automation of Today's Manual Processes 355
Table AP3.21: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation 355
Table AP3.22: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation 356
Table AP3.23: Consumer Attitudes to Voice Activation 356
Table AP3.24: Consumer Attitudes to Pre-Emption of Device Repairs 356
Table AP3.25: Consumer Attitudes to Pre-Emption of Device Repairs 357
Table AP3.26: Consumer Attitudes to Pre-Emption of Device Repairs 357
Table AP3.27: Consumer Attitudes to Remote Software Upgrades 358
Table AP3.28: Consumer Attitudes to Remote Software Upgrades 358
Table AP3.29: Consumer Attitudes to Remote Software Upgrades 359
Table AP3.30: Consumer Attitudes to Remote Software Upgrades 359
Table AP3.31: Consumer Attitudes to Remote Software Upgrades 359
Table AP3.32: Consumer Attitudes to Remote Software Upgrades 360
Table AP3.33: Consumer Attitudes to Remote Software Upgrades 360
Table AP3.34: Consumer Attitudes to Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce 361
Table AP3.35: Consumer Attitudes to Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce 361
Table AP3.36: Consumer Attitudes to Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce 361
Table AP3.37: Consumer Attitudes to Peripheral Product Replacement and E-Commerce 362
Table AP3.38: Consumer Attitudes to Universal Help Buttons 362
Table AP3.39: Consumer Attitudes to Universal Help Buttons 363
Table AP3.40: Consumer Attitudes to Universal Help Buttons 363
Table AP3.41: Consumer Attitudes to Universal Help Buttons 364
Table AP3.42: Consumer Attitudes to Universal Help Buttons 364
Table AP3.43: Consumer Attitudes to Universal Help Buttons 364
Table AP3.44: Consumer Attitudes to Data Sharing 365
Table AP3.45: Consumer Attitudes to Data Sharing 365
Table AP3.46: Consumer Attitudes to Data Sharing 366
Table AP3.47: Consumer Attitudes to Data Sharing 366
Table AP3.48: Consumer Attitudes to Data Sharing 366
Table AP3.49: Consumer Attitudes to Data Sharing 367
Table AP3.50: Consumer Attitudes to Data Privacy 367
Table AP3.51: Consumer Attitudes to Data Privacy 367
Table AP3.52: Consumer Attitudes to Data Privacy 368
Table AP3.53: Consumer Attitudes to Data Privacy 368
Table AP3.54: Consumer Attitudes to Data Privacy 369
Table AP3.55: Consumer Attitudes to Data Privacy 369
Table AP3.56: Consumer Attitudes to Data Privacy 370
Table AP3.57: Consumer Expectation of Warranties 370
Table AP3.58: Consumer Expectation of Warranties 371
Table AP3.59: Consumer Expectation of Warranties 371
Table AP3.60: Consumer Expectation of Warranties 372
Table AP3.61: Consumer Expectation of Warranties 372
Table AP3.62: Consumer Expectation of Warranties 372

Table AP3.63: Consumer Expectation of Warranty Length 373
Table AP3.64: Consumer Expectation of Warranty Length 374
Table AP3.65: Consumer Expectation of Warranty Length 374
Table AP3.66: Consumer Expectation of Warranty Length 375
Table AP3.67: Consumer Expectation of Warranty Length 375
Table AP3.68: Consumer Expectation of Warranty Length 376
Table AP3.69: Consumer Expectation of Insurance Provision 376
Table AP3.70: Consumer Expectation of Insurance Provision 377
Table AP3.71: Consumer Expectation of Insurance Provision 377
Table AP3.72: Advertising and Education Channels 377
Table AP3.73: Advertising and Education Channels 378
Table AP3.74: Advertising and Education Channels 378
Table AP3.75: Advertising and Education Channels 379






FIGURES
Chart 2.1: Question 3.5 - Use-case Ranking 44
Chart 2.2: Question 3.5 - Use-case Ranking 44
Chart 2.3: Question 3.2 - Use-case Display 45
Chart 2.4: Question 3.2 - Use-case Display 46
Chart 4.5: Question 3.1 - Use-case Monthly Cost: All Selections 49
Chart 2.6: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 58
Chart 2.7: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 58
Chart 4.1: Question 2.1 - Connected Device Ownership 165
Chart 4.2: Question 2.1 - Connected Device Ownership 166
Chart 4.3: Question 4..1 - Connected Device Cost 170
Chart 4.4: Question 4.4 - Associated Service Monthly Fee 174
Chart 4.5: Question 4.4 - Associated Service Monthly Fee 175
Chart 4.6: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 184
Chart 4.7: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 187
Chart 4.8: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 189
Chart 4.9: Question 2.2 - Connected Device Use-case 191
Chart 4.10: Question 3.5 - Use-case Ranking 198
Chart 4.11: Question 3.1 - Use-case Monthly Cost 200
Chart 4.12: Question 3.1 - Use-case Monthly Cost: All Selections 201
Chart 4.13: Question 3.2 - Use-case Display 203
Chart 4.14: Question 3.3 - Single Application Value 205
Chart 4.15: Question 3.4 - Data-type 207
Chart 4.16: Question 3.4 - Data-type 208
Chart 4.17: Question 3.6 - Device cost 210
Chart 4.18: Question 3.6 - Device Premium 211
Chart 4.19: Question 3.11 - Purchase Timeframe 221
Chart 4.20: Question 5.1 - Upfront and Monthly Service Fees 231

Chart 4.21: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preference 235
Chart 4.22: Question 5.2 - Managed Serice Provider Preference 245
Chart 4.23: Question 5.2 - Managed Service Provider Preferences 247
Chart 4.24: Question 5.7 - Self-install Motivation 252
Chart 4.25: Question 5.6 - Professional Install Motivation 255
Chart AP2.1: Question 1.2 - Respondent Age 309
Chart AP2.2: Question 1.2 - Respondent Age 311
Chart AP2.3: Question 1.3 - Respondent Gender 312
Chart AP2.4: Question 1.4 - Respondent Housing Tenure 314
Chart AP2.5: Question 1.4 - Respondent Housing Tenure 315
Chart AP2.6: Question 1.4 - Respondent Housing Tenure 316
Chart AP2.7: Question 1.5 - Dwelling-type 317
Chart AP2.8: Question 1.5 - Dwelling-type 318
Chart AP2.9: Question 1.5 - Dwelling-type 319
Chart AP2.10: Question 1.7 - Household Income 322
Chart AP2.11: Question 1.7 - Household Income 324
Chart AP2.12: Question 1.7 - Household Income 325
Chart AP2.13: Question 1.6 - Monthly Electricity Spend 327
Chart AP2.14: Question 1.6 - Monthly Electricity Spend 328
Chart AP2.15: Question 1.6 - Monthly Electricity Spend 330
Chart AP2.16: Question 1.10 - Smart TV 334
Chart AP2.17: Question 1.11 - Vehicle-type 336
Chart AP2.18: Question 1.11 - Vehicle-type 337
Chart AP2.19: Question 1.11 - Vehicle-type 338
Chart AP2.20: Question 1.13 - Pool Pump 340
Chart AP2.21: Question 1.13 - Pool Pump 341
Chart AP2.22: Question 1.14 - Secutiry System 342
Chart AP2.23: Question 1.14 - Security System 343
Chart AP2.24: Question 1.15 - Security System Description 345

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