Many factors influence how we as Americans eat—everything from our age to how much money we earn to whether or not we have children in our lives whose dietary needs or whims must be prioritized daily. As a result our eating habits are as varied and individualized as we ourselves are. Food industry players nonetheless have opportunities to target a wide variety of consumers whose choices often revolve among three key priorities: health, convenience, and variety.

In this data-packed Packaged Facts report, How We Eat: Retail and Foodservice Opportunities in When and Where America Eats, we examine modern mealtime habits and how these three core food priorities combine into a variety of trends that will continue to influence the food and beverage landscape into the foreseeable future. Our look at when Americans eat not only tracks in detail the times when various consumer segments are having meals, but how these patterns influence their tendencies to snack, to eat more than three meal a day, to make unhealthy food choices, and to eat socially or alone.


Our analysis also spans retail and foodservice. Food spending, whether at home or at restaurants, has been driven by the youngest and the oldest adult brackets. seniors are spending somewhat more on both food at home and food away from home than they did in 2007, while younger adult consumers are spending a great deal more on food at home (20%) and food away from home (23%). Spending growth among younger adults is driven by population increases, whereas spending increases among older consumers suggest a lifestyle change—not coincidentally, 2011 marks the first year that Baby Boomers have reached the age of 65. These consumers bring with them not only household wealth accrued over time, but also restaurant engagement levels greater than that of earlier generations, driving spending growth.


Table Of Contents

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Overview
Scope and Methodology
Mealtime Trends
The Return of the Home Cooked Meal
The Blurring Line Between Snacks and Meals
The Rise of the Fourthmeal
Eating Alone Is Becoming a New Normal
Ready Meals with a Healthy Twist Prove Ideal for Busy Lifestyles
Vitamins and Minerals from Real Foods not Supplements
Millennials Spur Collision of Technology and Foodservice
The Passing of the Generational Torch
Eating Trends
Snacking in America
Table 1-1: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Afternoon, Evening Snacks Are Most Popular
Table 1-2: Mealtime and Snacking Patterns: By Gender, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
Table 1-3: Patterns for Snacking Alone or With Others: Weekdays vs. Weekends, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
At-Home Snacks More Popular
When America Eats
Table 1-4: Percent Who Eat by Hour of Day: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Who Eats Together, Who Eats Alone
Healthy Habits and Eating Patterns
Table 1-5: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Foodservice Trends
Hispanics Driving Growth in Food Spending
Table 1-6: Food, Food at Home, Food Away from Home andamp; Restaurant Expense: Hispanic v. Non-Hispanic, 2007-2010
Growth at Opposite Ends of the Age Spectrum
Importance of $100K+ Households
Restaurant Usage by Major Segment
Table 1-7: Restaurant Usage by Major Segment, 3-Year Growth Index, 2008-2011
Restaurant Usage Trends by Generation
Restaurant Usage Trends by Household Income
Restaurant Usage Trends by Race/Ethnicity
Table 1-8: Prepared Foods Usage, Mean Usage and Usage Share by Retail Channel, 2012
Prepared Foods at Convenience Stores and Supermarkets
Key Points: Institutional Foodservice
Key Points: University Foodservice
Key Points: Corporate Foodservice
Key Points: Healthcare Foodservice
Key Points: U.S. Sports and Recreation Foodservice
Key Points: U.S. Amusement Park Foodservice
Eating at Restaurants by Daypart
Table 1-9: Percent at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Gender andamp; Generation, 2011
Meal Time Location Analysis

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Chapter 2: Mealtime Trends
The Return of the Home Cooked Meal
The Correlation Between a Healthy/Happy Family and Meals at Home
The Blurring Line Between Snacks and Meals
“Better-For-You” Snack Products in High Demand
Healthy Snacks Gain Significance with American Parents
The Rise of the Fourthmeal
Eating Alone Is Becoming a New Normal
Ready Meals with a Healthy Twist Prove Ideal for Busy Lifestyles
Vitamins and Minerals from Real Foods not Supplements
Millennials Spur Collision of Technology and Foodservice
Tracking Sustainability Online
Catering for the Adventurous
The Passing of the Torch: Millennials Are Becoming Greater Preoccupation for Marketers
Exotic Flavors and Ethnic Cuisine Find a Home at Local Retailers

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Chapter 3: Eating Trends
Overview
Snacking Patterns
Snacking, Fast Food, and the Return of Home Cooking in America
Table 3-1: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
U.S. Snack Market to Reach $77 Billion in 2015
Table 3-2: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Snack Foods, 2010-2015 (in billions of dollars)
Afternoon, Evening Snacks Are Most Popular
Table 3-3: Meals/Snacks Typically Eaten: Overall and by Gender, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
Table 3-4: Mealtime and Snacking Patterns: By Gender, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
Table 3-5: Patterns for Snacking Alone or With Others: Weekdays vs. Weekends, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
At-Home Snacks More Popular
Table 3-6: Patterns for Snacking at Home or Away from Home: Weekdays vs. Weekends, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
Table 3-7: Patterns for Snacking in Home Kitchen or Elsewhere in Home: Weekdays vs. Weekends, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
Table 3-8: Patterns for Snacking at Table, at Kitchen Counter, or Elsewhere in Home: Weekdays vs. Weekends, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
When America Eats: An Hour by Hour Analysis
Table 3-9: Percent Who Eat by Hour of Day: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Breakfast Cluster (7:00 am - 9:59 am)
Figure 3-1: Percent Who Eat During Breakfast (7:00 am - 9:59 am): By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent)
Lunch Cluster (12:00 pm - 2:59 pm)
Figure 3-2: Percent Who Eat During Lunch (12:00 pm - 2:59 pm): By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent)
Dinner Cluster (5:00 pm - 7:59 pm)
Figure 3-3: Percent Who Eat During Dinner (5:00 pm - 7:59 pm): By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent)
Fourthmeal Cluster (10:00 pm - 5:59 am)
Figure 3-4: Percent Who Eat “Fourthmeal” (10:00 pm - 5:59 am): By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent)
Who Eats Together, Who Eats Alone
Table 3-10: Social Eating Patterns by Hour of Day: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-11: Solo Eating Patterns by Hour of Day: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-12: Social or Solo Eating Patterns When Dining at Family Restaurants/Steakhouses or at Fast Food/Drive-In Restaurants: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Consumer Eating Psychographics
Healthy Habits and Eating Patterns
Table 3-13: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
“Better-For-You” Snack Products in High Demand
Natural and Organic Product Claims in Food and Beverage
Table 3-14: Consumer Opinion on Natural and Organic Products, February 2011 (percent)
Majority of Americans Seek Healthy Lifestyles
Figure 3-5: Consumer Psychographics: Physical Health and Fitness, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
Groceries and Consumer Health Goals
Figure 3-6: Consumer Psychographics: Healthy Eating and Dieting, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
Older Americans Favor Health, While Young Adults More Likely to Have Unhealthy Eating Habits
Table 3-15: Selected Psychographic Patterns Associated With Unhealthy Eating Habits: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-16: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Adventurous Eaters
Table 3-17: Selected Foodie Psychographics: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Dining on a Budget
Table 3-18: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
Consumers Remain Thrifty
Table 3-19: Consumer Attitudes: “Price Not Main Factor in Purchases” and “Spending More on Consumer Products, ” February 2011 (percent)
Table 3-20: Responses to Statements Related to Grocery Spending, February 2011 (percent)
The American Dinner Table: Home Cooked Meals vs. Frozen Foods vs. Pre-Cooked Meals
Table 3-21: Selected Attitudes About What People Eat and Likelihood to Cook Meals: By Generational Age Bracket, 2011 (percent and index)
How Millennials Eat
Snacking and Selected Meal Trends
Table 3-23: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-24: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
When Millennials Eat: An Hour by Hour Analysis
Table 3-25: Percent Who Eat by Hour of Day: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-7: When Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials) Eat: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and Fourthmeal, 2011 (percent)
Millennials Eating Together, Millennials Eating Alone
Figure 3-8: When Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials) Are Most Likely to Eat Socially: by Hour of Day, 2011 (index)
Table 3-26: When Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials) Are Most Likely to Eat Socially: By Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-9: When Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials) Are Most Likely to Eat Alone: By Hour of Day, 2011 (index)
Table 3-27: When Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials) Are Most Likely to Eat Alone: By Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-28: Social or Solo Eating Patterns When Dining at Family Restaurants/Steakhouses or at Fast Food/Drive-In Restaurants: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2011 (percent and index)
Millennials and (Sometimes) Healthy Habits Eating Patterns
Table 3-29: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-30: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Many Millennials Too Busy to Make Good Eating Choices
Table 3-31: Selected Psychographic Patterns Suggestive of Unhealthy Eating Habits: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-32: Selected Psychographic Patterns Suggestive of Unhealthy Eating Habits: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Table 3-33: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-34: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Marketing to Millennials Means Appealing to Their Foodie Tendencies
Table 3-35: Selected Foodie Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-36: Selected Foodie Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Millennials Dine on a Budget
Table 3-37: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-38: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
When Dining at Home, Millennials Prefer Frozen and Pre-Cooked Meals
Table 3-39: Selected Attitudes About What People Eat and Likelihood to Cook Meals: Adults Age 18-29, 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-40: Selected Attitudes About What People Eat and Likelihood to Cook Meals: Adults Age 18-29 (Millennials), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
How Generation X Eats
Snacking and Selected Meal Trends
Table 3-41: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-42: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
When Gen Xers Eat: An Hour by Hour Analysis
Table 3-43: Percent Who Eat by Hour of Day: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-10: When Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers) Eat: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and Fourthmeal, 2011 (percent)
Gen Xers Eating Together, Gen Xers Eating Alone
Table 3-44: When Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers) Are Most Likely to Eat Socially: by Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-11: When Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers) Are Most Likely to Eat Socially: by Hour of Day, 2011 (index)
Table 3-45: When Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers) Are Most Likely to Eat Alone: by Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-12: When Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers) Are Most Likely to Eat Alone: By Hour of Day, 2011 (index)
Table 3-46: Social or Solo Eating Patterns When Dining at Family Restaurants/Steakhouses or at Fast Food/Drive-In Restaurants: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen X), 2011 (percent and index)
Gen Xers and Healthy Habits Eating Patterns
Table 3-47: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-48: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Haste and Unhealthy Eating for Gen Xers
Table 3-49: Selected Psychographic Patterns Suggestive of Unhealthy Eating Habits: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-50: Selected Psychographic Patterns Suggestive of Unhealthy Eating Habits: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Table 3-51: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-52: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Appealing to the Foodie Nature of Gen Xers
Table 3-53: Selected Foodie Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-54: Selected Foodie Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Coupons Influence What New Food Products Gen Xers Purchase
Table 3-55: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-56: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Gen Xers Prefer to Prepare Home Cooked Meals over Frozen Foods or Pre-Cooked Meals
Table 3-57: Selected Attitudes About What People Eat and Likelihood to Cook Meals: Adults Age 30-44 (Gen Xers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-58: Selected Attitudes About What People Eat and Likelihood to Cook Meals: Adults Age 30-44, 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
How Baby Boomers Eat
Snacking and Selected Meal Trends
Table 3-59: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-60: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
When Baby Boomers Eat: An Hour by Hour Analysis
Table 3-61: Percent Who Eat by Hour of Day: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-13: When Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers) Eat: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and Fourthmeal, 2011 (percent)
Boomers Eating Together, Boomers Eating Alone
Table 3-62: When Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers) Are Most Likely to Eat Socially: by Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-14 :When Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers) Are Most Likely to Eat Socially: by Hour of Day, 2011 (index)
Table 3-63: When Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers) Are Most Likely to Eat Alone: by Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-15: When Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers) Are Most Likely to Eat Alone: by Hour of Day, 2011 (index)
Table 3-64: Social or Solo Eating Patterns When Dining at Family Restaurants/Steakhouses or at Fast Food/Drive-In Restaurants: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2011 (percent and index)
Boomers Take Pride in Their Health
Table 3-65: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-66: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Haste Can Derail Boomers’ Healthy Efforts
Table 3-67: Selected Psychographic Patterns Suggestive of Unhealthy Eating Habits: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-68: Selected Psychographic Patterns Suggestive of Unhealthy Eating Habits: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Table 3-69: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-70: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Adventurous Eating Is Not a Boomer Trait
Table 3-71: Selected Foodie Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-72: Selected Foodie Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Fast Food Becoming a Budget Strategy for Boomers
Table 3-73: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64, 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-74: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: Adults Age 45-64, 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Boomers Have a Love of Cooking and Avoid Frozen Foods or Pre-Cooked Meals
Table 3-75: Selected Attitudes About What People Eat and Likelihood to Cook Meals: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-76: Selected Attitudes About What People Eat and Likelihood to Cook Meals: Adults Age 45-64 (Baby Boomers), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
How Seniors Eat
Snacking and Selected Meal Trends
Table 3-77: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-78: Selected Meal and Snack Psychographics: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
When Seniors Eat: An Hour by Hour Analysis
Table 3-79: Percent Who Eat by Hour of Day: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-16: When Adults Age 65+ (Seniors) Eat: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and Fourthmeal, 2011 (percent)
Seniors Eating Together, Seniors Eating Alone
Table 3-80: When Adults Age 65+ (Seniors) Are Most Likely to Eat Socially: By Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-17: When Adults Age 65+ (Seniors) Are Most Likely to Eat Socially: By Hour of Day, 2011 (index)
Table 3-81: When Adults Age 65+ (Seniors) Are Most Likely to Eat Alone: By Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Figure 3-18: When Adults Age 65+ (Seniors) Are Most Likely to Eat Alone: By Hour of Day, 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-82: Social or Solo Eating Patterns When Dining at Family Restaurants/Steakhouses or at Fast Food/Drive-In Restaurants: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2011 (percent and index)
Seniors Leading the Health and Wellness Charge
Table 3-83: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-84: Selected Wellness and Nutrition Psychographics: Adults Age 65+, 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Fast Food Gaining Popularity with Even Most Health Conscious Cohort
Table 3-85: Selected Psychographic Patterns Suggestive of Unhealthy Eating Habits: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-86: Selected Psychographic Patterns Suggestive of Unhealthy Eating Habits: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Table 3-87: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-88: Selected Weight Loss/Dieting Goals Psychographics: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Gourmet and Foreign Cuisine Growing on Seniors
Table 3-89: Selected Foodie Psychographics: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-90: Selected Foodie Psychographics: Adults Age 65+ (Seniors), 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Fast Food Beginning to Fit Seniors’ Budgets Due to Recession’s Lingering Impact
Table 3-91: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: Adults Age 65+, 2011 (percent and index)
Table 3-92: Selected Budget-Based Mealtime Decision Making Psychographics: Adults Age 65+, 2007-2011 (percent who agree)
Seniors Prefer Easy to Prepare and Frozen Meals
Table 3-93: Selected Attitudes About What People Eat and Likelihood to Cook Meals: Adults Age 65+, 2011 (percent and index)

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Chapter 4: Foodservice Trends
Foodservice Definitions
Limited-Service Restaurant Definitions
Limited-Service Restaurants
Quick-Service Restaurants
Fast Casual Restaurants
Snack and Beverage Establishments
Full-Service Restaurant Definitions
Full-Service Restaurants
Family Dining Restaurants
Casual Dining Restaurants
Fine Dining Restaurants
Foodservice Market Definitions
Sports and Recreation
Corporations
College/Universities
Healthcare
Other Definitions
Daypart
Guest Traffic
Restaurant Spending and Usage Trends
Consumer Restaurant Spending Trends
Restaurant Growth: Follow the Money
Table 4-1: Demographic Share of Household Income: 2007-2010
Table 4-2: Demographic Shares of Persons andamp; Households: 2007-2010
Food at Home Gains
Hispanics Driving Growth in Food Spending
Table 4-3: Food, Food at Home, Food Away from Home andamp; Restaurant Expense: Hispanic v. Non-Hispanic, 2007-2010
Driving Restaurant Spending
Table 4-4: Restaurant Share of Spend by Restaurant Segment: Hispanic v. Non-Hispanic, 2007-2010
Driving Dayparts
Table 4-5: Restaurant Share of Spend by Daypart: Hispanic v. Non-Hispanic, 2007-2010
Growth at Opposite Ends of the Age Spectrum
Lifestyle Change to Mark Restaurant Spending Boom?
Table 4-6: Food, Food at Home, Food Away from Home andamp; Restaurant Expense by Age, 2007-2010
Carrying Full-Service Restaurants
Table 4-7: Share of Spend by Restaurant Segment: By Age, 2007-2010
Daypart Spending Trends
Table 4-8: Restaurant Share of Spend by Daypart: By Age, 2007-2010
Household Income Trends
Table 4-9: Food, Food at Home, Food Away from Home andamp; Restaurant Expense, by HH Income, 2007-2010
Table 4-10: Restaurant Share of Spend by Restaurant Segment by Household Income, 2007-2010
Daypart Trends
Table 4-11: Restaurant Share of Spend by Daypart by Household Income, 2007-2010
Restaurant Guest Traffic Analysis
Visit Frequency Definitions
Snack and Beverage
Limited Service
Full Service
Population Growth Saves Industry
Table 4-12: Restaurant Usage by Major Segment, 3-Year Growth Index, 2008-2011
Stable Guest Visit Frequency Trends
Table 4-13: Limited-Service andamp; Full-Service Restaurant Guest Visit Frequency, 2008-2011
Restaurant Usage Trends by Generation
Snack and Beverage Usage Declines
Table 4-14: Restaurant Segment Usage andamp; Growth by Generation, 2008-2011
LSR Guest Visit Frequency by Age
Figure 4-1: Limited-Service Restaurant Usage Frequency by Age/Generation, 2011
LSR guest visit frequency, by age
Consumers Age 45-64 Lead Usage Growth
Table 4-15: Limited-Service Restaurant Guest Traffic Trending by Age/Generation, 2008-2011
Full-Service Restaurant Guest Visit Frequency by Age
Figure 4-2: Full-Service Restaurant Usage Frequency by Age/Generation, 2011
LSR guest visit frequency, by age
Gen Y Leads Full-Service Traffic Growth
Table 4-16: Full-Service Restaurant Guest Traffic Trending by Age/Generation, 2008-2011
Restaurant Usage Trends by Household Income
Downward Migration in Household Income Has Serious Ramifications for Restaurant Industry
Table 4-17: Restaurant Segment Usage andamp; Growth by Household Income, 2008-2011
Limited-Service Restaurant Guest Visit Frequency by Household Income
Figure 4-3: Limited-Service Restaurant Usage Frequency by Household Income, 2011
LSR guest visit frequency, by age
andlt;$50K Household Income LSR Users Increase 16%
Table 4-18: Limited-Service Restaurant Segment Usage andamp; Growth by Household Income, 2008-2011
Table 4-19: Limited-Service Restaurant Guest Traffic Trending by HH Income, 2008-2011
Full-Service Restaurant Guest Visit Frequency by Household Income
Figure 4-4: Full-Service Restaurant Usage Frequency by HH Income, 2011
Loss of $50K+ FSR Users Not Made Up by Gains andlt;$50K Household Income Users
Table 4-20: Full-Service Restaurant Segment Usage andamp; Growth by Household Income, 2008-2011
Pullback in Usage Among $75K+ Household Income Groups
Table 4-21: Full-Service Restaurant Guest Traffic Trending by Household Income, 2008-2011
Restaurant Usage Trends by Race/Ethnicity
Table 4-22: Restaurant Segment Usage andamp; Growth by Race/Ethnicity, 2008-2011
Limited-Service Restaurant Guest Visit Frequency by Race/Ethnicity
Figure 4-5: Limited-Service Restaurant Usage Frequency by Race/Ethnicity, 2011
Full- Service Restaurant Guest Visit Frequency by Race/Ethnicity
Table 4-23: Limited-Service andamp; Full-Service Restaurant Guest Traffic Trending, Hispanics, 2008-2011
Restaurant Guest Traffic Analysis by Daypart
Dinner Remains Biggest Draw
Breakfast and Snack Growth
LSR Breakfast, LSR Dinner and FSR Snack Outpace Other Daypart Segments
Table 4-25: 2011 Daypart Use by Restaurant Segment: Age
Percentage Breakfast Use Among 35-44s Grows Over Time
Percentage Snacking Use Among 25-34s on the Upswing
Table 4-26: 2008-2011 Daypart Usage Growth by Restaurant Segment: Age
Table 4-27: 2011 Daypart Use by Restaurant Segment: HH Income
Table 4-28: 2008-2011 Daypart Usage Growth by Restaurant Segment: Household Income
Retail Foodservice
Table 4-29: Prepared Foods Usage, Mean Usage and Usage Share by Retail Channel, 2012
Pizza a Cross-Channel Hit; Most Options Skew to Either C-Store or Supermarket
Table 4-30: Prepared Foods Items Purchased in Past 3 Months: Supermarket vs. Convenience Stores
Traditional Beverages Still Popular; C-Store Beverage Variety Shows Through
Table 4-31: Dispensed Beverages Purchased in Past 3 Months: Supermarket vs. Convenience Stores
Institutional Foodservice
Limited-Service Restaurants
Full-Service Restaurants
Snack and Beverage Concepts
Institutional Foodservice
Table 4-32: Foodservice Establishment Usage and Mean Use by Restaurant and Institutional Foodservice Category and Type, 2010
Institutional Foodservice Usage Analysis
Note on Reading Charts
Institutional Foodservice Usage by Category
Figure 4-7: Institutional Foodservice Use in Last Month by Foodservice Category: By Gender, 2010
U.S. Sports and Recreation Foodservice
U.S. Sports and Entertainment Foodservice
Table 4-33: Major Sports and Entertainment Attendance, Mean Visits andamp; Visit Share by Type of Sport/Entertainment , 2011
MLB Consumer Food and Drink Analysis: Food Purchases Lead Beverages
Table 4-34: Major League Baseball Visitors: Food, Non-Alcoholic Beverage andamp; Alcoholic Beverage Use, Selected Demographics, 2011
Table 4-35: Major Entertainment Attendance Trends, 2007-2011
Musical performance consumer food and drink analysis
Table 4-36: Musical Performance Attendees: Food, Non-Alcoholic Beverage andamp; Alcoholic Beverage Use, Selected Demographics, 2011
Theatrical Performance Consumer Food and Drink Analysis
Table 4-37: Theatrical Production Attendees: Food, Non-Alcoholic Beverage andamp; Alcoholic Beverage Use, Selected Demographics, 2011
U.S. Amusement Park Foodservice
Table 4-38: Theme Park Visitors: Restaurant Usage and Frequency of Use by Restaurant Type, 2011
Disneyworld Park Analysis
Table 4-39: Disneyland andamp; Disneyworld Visitors: Restaurant Usage and Frequency of Use by Restaurant Type, 2011
Table 4-40: Theme Park Visitors: BYO Food andamp; Drink, 2011
An Age-Driven Decision
Table 4-41: Theme Park Visitors: BYO Food andamp; Drink by Age, 2011
Food and Beverage Spend Is Part of the Visit
Table 4-42: Theme Park Spending Analysis: Admission Ticket, Souvenirs, Food, Beverages andamp; Parking, 2011
Eating andamp; Restaurants as Daily Activities
Table 4-43: Percent at Home, Traveling, Elsewhere and at Restaurant, Bar or Cafe: By Hour of Day, 2011
Weekday Analysis
Table 4-44: Percent at Home, Traveling, Elsewhere and at Restaurant, Bar or Cafe: By Hour of Day, Weekdays, 2011
Weekend Analysis
Table 4-45: Percent at Home, Traveling, Elsewhere and at Restaurant, Bar or Cafe: By Hour of Day, Weekends, 2011
Eating Analysis
Weekdays v. Weekends
Table 4-46: Percent Eating, Weekday vs. Weekend Percentages and Indexes: By Hour of Day 2011
Table 4-47: Percent Eating andamp; Eating at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Daypart, 2011
Weekday Analysis
Table 4-48: Weekday Percent Eating andamp; Eating at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Daypart, 2011
Table 4-49: Weekend Percent Eating andamp; Eating at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Daypart, 2011
Demographic Analysis
Table 4-50: Percent at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Gender andamp; Generation, 2011
Table 4-51: Percent at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Race/Ethnicity, DMA andamp; HH income, 2011
Table 4-52: Weekday Percent at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Gender andamp; Generation, 2011
Table 4-53: Weekday Percent at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Race/Ethnicity, DMA andamp; HH income, 2011
Table 4-54: Weekend Percent at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Gender andamp; Generation, 2011
Table 4-55: Weekend Percent at Restaurant, Bar, Pub or Cafe: By Race/Ethnicity, DMA andamp; HH income, 2011
Meal Time Location Analysis
Table 4-56: Top 6 Weekday Eating Locations, 8am-8:59am, 2011
Table 4-57: Top 6 Weekday Eating Locations, 12pm-12:59pm, 2011
Table 4-58: Top 6 Weekday Eating Locations, 6pm-6:59pm, 2011

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5 Companies

Company Profiles

Staples UK Retail Ltd.

United Kingdom

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

United States

Starbucks Corp.

United States

Staples Inc.

United States

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