SUMMARY

INTRODUCTION TO BIOMIMICRY

THE MARKET FOR BIOINSPIRED INNOVATIONS
Market challenges

DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMIMICRY

PHILOSOPHY AND PRINCIPLES OF BIOMIMICRY
The need for biomimicry

BIOUTILISATION
Algae
Fungi
Insect proteins
Microorganisms
Organic waste materials
Essential oils
Other materials derived from substances found in nature
PLA fibres
Proteins found in nature

FUNCTIONAL FEATURES INCORPORATED IN PERFORMANCE

APPAREL WHICH ARE REPLICATED FROM NATURE
Antimicrobial efficacy
Chitosan
Shark skin
Bioluminescence
Camouflage
Drag reduction
Dry adhesion
Burdock plant
Gecko feet
High strength
Limpet teeth
Spider silk
Moisture management
Pine cone effect
Xylem conduits
Structural coloration
Morphotex
Thermal insulation
Bird feathers
Polar bear hairs
Thermoregulation
Water repellency
Examples of textile technologies and materials based on the lotus effect
Inspiration from nature spurs developments in textiles

BIOMIMICRY AND SUSTAINABILITY

OUTLOOK

List of tables
Table 1: Key principles of biomimicry
Table 2: Organic waste materials used in textile production
Table 3: Living organisms and natural materials and the functions they have inspired in performance apparel
Table 4: Properties of various types of spider silk and other materials

List of figures
Figure 1 : Vollebak Plant and Algae T Shirt
Figure 2: Moon Parka
Figure 3: Vollebak Black Squid Jacket
Figure 4: Dermal denticles of a shark
Figure 5: Fastskin LZR Intent Jammer
Figure 6: Seed head of burdock plant
Figure 7: Microscopic image of Velcro
Figure 8: Biofabric tennis dress
Figure 9: Pine cone effect
Figure 10: Microscopic image of a butterfly wing
Figure 11 : Vollebak Blue Morpho Jacket
Figure 12: Beading up of water on the leaf of a lotus plant
Figure 13: Microscopic image of the surface of a lotus leaf
Figure 14: Surface of a cat tongue